1 Peter 1:11 The Compassion of Christ (The Suffering of Christ and the Glories That Follow)

1 Peter 1:11 The Compassion of Christ (The Suffering of Christ and the Glories That Follow)


Normally I don’t do things this way, but I’m going to tell you how are going to order the service, because came to my attention that there are so many people who have never come to the Table before that I’m going to cover a few areas. So, I’m telling you in advance. I’ll even tell you the Scripture going to use as our, my message and meditation that I want to just kind of think about, which is out of 1 Peter, believe it or not, a Communion out of 1 Peter. “Wow, she’s just stuck in that book.” 1 Peter and chapter 1 and verse 11, and I’ll read that to you in a moment. But, we’re going to set up a few things. We’re going to define some terminology. Don’t, and be careful, you old-timers. Don’t jump to conclusions until you hear me out. We will underscore the importance of who it is that can partake to maybe debunk some of the craziness in the church world, and third the method and means of partaking. I will take you through that and then we will go to the message. I will preach the message from the text of 1 Peter 1:11, and then we will go to the Table when I’m done setting the teaching in place. So are normally don’t order something this rigidly, but I came prepared with a lot of things that I’d like to at least clear up. So, first things first: let me read the text, which is going to be the footing of everything we do here. I’m highlighting these words out of 1 Peter 1 and verse 11, “the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow.” And we’ll make some corrections to the text as well. So that’s where we will depart from when I’m ready. There are a lot of misconceptions about this Table. If we read, please don’t turn there, but if we read in Matthew and Mark’s Gospel, we find that the event, which we know is occurring as the Last Supper and the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and we have an order, at least from Matthew and Mark, which probably share a common source of Jesus taking the bread and blessing the bread, and then taking the cup and giving thanks for the cup. In Matthew and Mark we have the bread, and when Jesus takes the bread, He blesses the bread. Do you remember we covered this word, eulogesas? Remember from “good words.” So when Jesus took bread, He blessed it and when He took the cup, He gave thanks, and that is eu-, I should write it in English eucharistas, “good” and from the root where we get “grace,” or “thanks.” So two separate words are being used, not but that’s going to make or break anything, because we get to Luke’s Gospel, he uses “eucharist” for both the bread and the cup. And basically if you don’t read Luke carefully, it appears as though the cup is distributed and then they partake. No. The cup, the bread, the cup. He says, “Distribute this,” in Luke, “amongst yourselves,” then He took the bread, then He says, “Likewise the cup.” So the order’s the same. Now don’t become legalist on me and say, “Well, we got to do it just like they did it and take the bread and the cup in that order.” That’s too much of what has divided the church over something that should unite the church. This is one act that Jesus; Luke adds and tells in his writing, “This act, do in remembrance of me.” It’s the one place where we can’t be missing the mark on this that He said, “Do this. Do it.” There’s very few things He told us to do, this is one of them. So it’s kind of interesting that we have an order which I’m not going to be a legalist over and say, “Well, we have to do it this way.” It’s kind of interesting, the words that Jesus used, and of course the apostle Paul will pick this up in his writings in 1 Corinthians. Now, why all this is important is because there’s so much nitpicking going on, I figured we might as well pick the nits out and throw them out the door. So terminology, let’s talk about that. First and foremost, we know that this Last Supper that was occurring, as I said, the first day on the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which would have been a gathering, a coming together. Too much in this act of grace has become something robotic. And within the confines of Scripture, let me just say one thing regarding this Table, we never find the words “Communion.” It’s represented by this, so when we speak of “Communion,” I want to be clear. I have no problem, I love calling this “Communion,” because “Communion” comes from the Greek word, koino-, koinonia, that is “to jointly participate,” or “share.” It’s also translated “fellowship,” and I have no problem with that terminology, even though it’s just like the word “trinity.” It doesn’t appear but yet we, we know it is a true statement. So, “Communion” is fine. The apostle Paul uses the word, two words, the “Lord’s Supper,” and he calls it the “Lord’s Supper,” which has another interesting Greek concept to it, kuriakon, “the Lord’s.” It is the supper that belongs to the Lord. So, I have no problem if you are coming from a different denomination, specifically people who are watching who have never partaken in a Protestant church before; my goodness, gracious. Let’s be clear about something. Terminology is basically labels that people put on things, and depending on what background you come from, people will say, “Do you take the Eucharist?” or there’s so many different terms. There’s only one I want to stay away from for this church. It’s the first time I’m giving you dogma that I’m telling you something I want to avoid. I don’t want people to call this “holy Communion,” and I’ll tell you why. It’s not against Catholics by the way. It’s because our language does not necessarily help us and there’s a lot of confusion. When people say the word “holy,” they don’t really know what they’re saying, so the first it does is it scares people away. That’s the first thing it does. The very thing the Jesus said, “Do this,” scares people away. The second thing is that you linguists that are present and the ones who’ve been around, the word “holy” suggests something that is set apart, set aside for the exclusive use of the deity and now I put right next to that word “Communion.” So, something that’s set apart for Him exclusively and then I’m going to jointly participate in it. It has a little bit of confusion, so rather than; I’m just telling you this one term I want to stay away from. You can do like I do and call this the “Table Lord,” the “Lord’s Supper,” or “Communion,” but let’s be clear on the terminology so that the one word I want to avoid is the one that brings the most fear, so we get that out a way and that’s kind of part parked. The next thing I want talk about is what this should represent. There is a lot of nuttiness out there. If you travel through the, the different denominations, we have people that say, “Well, it’s open Communion”; “It’s closed communion.” Okay, for the ones that don’t have any clue of what that means: “open,” all can partake; “closed,” it’s only those who have qualified. Right away there; yeah, exactly. Right away there, for the ones that know you recognize that’s problematic, because if we were to try and identify who qualifies none of us would. That should be the starting point. So, much at this Table of grace becomes a table of frustration for trying to tell people: your sins are forgiven, the ones yesterday and last year and ten years ago, and the ones today, the ones I’m yet to commit, and the ones I will commit. So who could qualify? So in that framework this table represents one principle, those who faithe and have come by faith. Now when Jesus brought this beautiful commemorative act forward, He was actually drawing back on the Passover that we read about in the Book of Exodus. On the eve of the children of Israel’s being delivered out of bondage from Pharaoh in Egypt, we have this, this institution of Passover being implemented that is pretty simple. There are three things that the children of Israel were told to do. If you recall back there in the book of Exodus, we have the chronicle, we have the chronicle… It’s L. A. it’s okay. We have the chronicle of the children of Israel seeing the successive plagues and the last one we are told is death upon the first born. And God spells it very clear and says, “But to these who will do what I’m asking you,” and He gives the instructions, “you’ll be spared.” So they are told, the children of Israel, way back there in the Book of Exodus, they are told to; Exodus 12 and 13, we have the record; they are told to kill a lamb, and for each respective household apply the blood to the doorpost and lintel, so the entranceway was covered. And obviously that very simple act was done so that when angel, the death angel passed over, it would see the blood, the blood would be as a sign, and pass over that household, and those who were in would be spared. So they had to apply for blood, they had to apply the blood by killing a lamb. They had to go inside. That lamb would be roasted and then they would eat. That’s part of the instructions; they would eat the lamb, roasted lamb. One, two, and three: they were to be dressed, shoes on their feet, their loins girded, and staff in hand. Now a lot of times we tend to forget that and the modern church has taken off on some crazy tangent about who qualifies. Well, let me ask, and it’s a rhetorical question: do you think any of these children of Israel; while death was foretold and they had seen the successive plagues, do you think any of them went in their house and said, “Oh, gee, do you think we qualify to apply the blood here? Let’s think about this.” If they didn’t they died and they knew it. It didn’t matter how rich you were, it didn’t matter how poor you were; you obeyed these instructions, and you did it as an act of obedience by faith. So when we travel back and we see these, we’ll make them apply in a minute in the New Testament. And we have again this concept, people who have not properly translated Scripture or who read sloppy will say, “Well, we have to check ourselves and make sure.” Well then let’s, let’s analyze that for a minute. Let’s go back now to this New Testament meal and let’s look at the disciples. After they partook; let’s, if we were going that they were worthy to partake, after they partook, Judas went out and betrayed Jesus; that’s worthy, isn’t it? And Peter, well, he denied our Lord three times; that’s worthy, isn’t it? And then, last but not least, the ones that were left after Jesus was arrested, they all fled. Yes, so I don’t think we should be self examining in light of the disciples or any other instruction given. I think the point is driven home enough. It is only those people who are fixated on legalism and spiritual upmanship, one-upmanship who would tell you to look at yourself. Our eyes, when we go to this Table are completely focused on Jesus, 1000 percent. So that’s the, at least the place of departure for us. Now, this application to the Passover and to the Last Supper, how this applies to us, applying the blood as the children of Israel did, for us seems quite logical that we are taking, appropriating that act, that finished act at Calvary where Jesus’ blood was poured out and applying it to our hearts. It’s not something you physically go and do, it’s something by faith. And they were told to close the door. They didn’t just apply the blood and leave the door open, they closed the door, and they ate the roasted lamb for strength. There are so many pictures we could bring forward into the New Testament frame. Jesus, as He walked around, He said, “I am the true bread,” He spoke of Himself as the sustenance for us strength and our well-being. But the one I want to focus on just a little bit is this right here. You see, a lot of times people approach this table and they will look at the cup and they’ll look at the bread, but they forget this one important part; shoes are for walking. Their loins girded up means they wore those robes, they would gather the robe ready, ready to go, ready eagerly, and staff in hand, and they ate the roasted lamb in haste. A lot of times people approach this Table and they’re approaching elements and saying, “Now I’ll claim my healing.” No, no, no, no, no. This is why I made them sing, Rise and Be Healed, first. Because the act of faith and expectancy in God to do should be before we even get to the Table, it’s the one thing I’m going to ask you to do. I hope you’re all wearing shoes, but I’m talking about spiritual realm; ready to go. These were ready to be delivered from the bondage of Egypt. These were ready to be delivered and make the journey into the Promised Land. These were ready to be healed. These were ready; ready as in, “I’m dressed, I’m eating, come on let’s go. It’s done.” Not, I do it now and then I come back and say, “Oh Lord, make it happen.” Do you hear what I’m saying? Too many times that becomes what, if this is not a faith inspiring moment for you, you know, let me find where you are so I might be able to come and tell you just right, right face-to-face. These children of Israel, I really believe, having seen the successive plagues, having seen, they knew to get dressed and get ready, staff in hand, ready for deliverance. So I’m going to ask you, for the ones that came here for a need today; guess what? We all have a need. All of us do. Are you ready for that need to be filled by God today? Are you ready? Good, well that was only about 80 percent of you. So, it’s okay, I’m not going to be too hard on the rest, the balance of you who are still working on it. But, one of the things that I would like to highlight before I get into the message is we approach this table; we say Jesus instituted this and said, “Do this. You remember my death.” The apostle Paul says as often as, “As oft as you eat and drink,” which is another thing. This is our second Communion together, but we play Communion around-the-clock on the network; as often as you need to take. Some churches say, “We have to do it once a year.” Some say, “Once a month.” And I say if you’re wanting to walk by faith, you do it as many times if you’re sick. And for some of us, who are not sick today, going to the Table for daily forgiveness. It’s not a one-time event for me, I ask for daily forgiveness. Having said that, let’s talk a little bit about what is used, because, as I said, we have many people for the first time joining us. In the 11th century the Church at Rome and the Eastern Orthodox Church had just one of many, many, many schisms over leavened or unleavened bread. Can you believe it? The church was fighting over bread. It’s like, people we have worse problems than to fight over bread. So I’m telling you, here we are using unleavened bread. If you want to be a purist about it, and the Scripture says that they were celebrating the Feast of Unleavened Bread. But in the home, if you don’t have unleavened bread, anything that is symbolic of, typifying the body of Christ, which could be a cookie, a cracker, bread with; it could be pumpernickel bread, or cinnamon bread. I don’t know. I’m just telling you. This is the stuff that when people start to pick apart we lose the focus. And so we’re clear, I do not hold to the doctrine that these elements are changed mystically into anything. They are an emblem for us to look at, to focus on our minds on the finished work of Christ, that’s all. We could entertain you probably for a long time on all the things that people fight over in the church, including what to drink, what to partake with, which is another anomaly. I’m telling you as a church and as a congregation; Jesus did not have any issue with wine. Wine goes clear through, in fact, I’ve been teaching on the vine through the history of the children of Israel. Both type as viticulture and as an emblem of their culture and nation. If you know the lay of the land in that culture where Jesus walked, you’ve got just a whole plethora of varieties of things. So any person that says, “No, He didn’t partake,” and they don’t want to read the miracles, but most importantly there’s one, one passage in Matthew’s Gospel which is very strange. We know that when Jesus was on the cross they brought, it says they brought vinegar and tried to touch a reed to His lips. By the way, vinegar is fermented something, all right. So it’s just like wine. They touched it to His lips and He wouldn’t take it. But, in Matthew’s Gospel, just a little few verses earlier it says that He took of it. He tasted it. This was before He was crucified. Now that’s only appearing in Matthew’s Gospel, but I’m telling you something. Vinegar is a fermented drink. And one record of Jesus partaking there, I wonder, did He distribute the wine and the cup to the people and not partake Himself? So we engage in all of these silly things, including the fact that just alone while these, these puppies, which are not real I think, they’re fake. So don’t eat them, unless you’ll really need a healing. But if they were real, natural grapes of any kind bring and have mold and bacteria on them naturally. So even if Jesus drank grape juice, it would have mold and bacteria in it. Get, we get just so caught up on silly things, which I believe the devil brought to lure our eyes away from the more important things. So we’re serving wine. There’s some substitutes that will come through on the trays. But you at home, if you don’t have great juice or wine, use water, orange juice. We’re not looking for the elements to be changed into something mystical. We’re looking to what they represent. So, having said that, at least I hope by some degree we’ve cleared up for especially for new people coming who have been subjected to so many damnable heresies over just the course of time. Listen, when Jesus partook and He broke the bread, He was sitting at the table and His flesh was still on His body and it was still intact. And when He poured the cup and give them to drink, His veins, the veins of Jesus Christ still contained His blood. It wasn’t poured out into that pitcher. So we have a lot of crazy ideas I want to just kind of dispel and move them away from this Table and focus on what we are here to do. So, now I’ve given you be, kind of the 70-league boot to get us caught up so everybody’s all in the same place. Using the text of 1 Peter and 1 and 11, I want you to make one correction to the text, please. And that is that it says, “the sufferings,” plural, “of Christ, and the glory.” It should read, “and the glories.” And why is that important? Because, first of all, it reads like that in the Greek; it reads “glories,” plural, but we’re going to see the glories that would follow. And I think you will find it quite interesting that, I don’t think we’ve ever done a Communion like this before. So, I hope you’ll kind of switch gears with me, and let’s see what type of glories are revealed to us immediately within the realm of Jesus’ sufferings and glories. In fact, I’m going to write this up here, because as we go, we will add to it; so, sufferings and glories; plural, both. Now, it’s necessary to say you cannot consider the sufferings of Jesus Christ; I told you we’re using this as our text, but I’m not staying there. So just kind of put this in the back of your mind. This is the subtext for everything else. You cannot consider the sufferings of Christ without considering some paradoxical factors, like His joy. And let me explain this, because it sounds kind of weird. But all of this, what I’m about to say will make no sense if we don’t consider something in light of. First of all, we’re looking at Jesus sufferings in themselves and how they are applicable to us today. What can we glean out of the sufferings and glories from approaching this Table at that standpoint? So first things first; we all agree and understand that Jesus came in the flesh. He took up a tent of human flesh, born of a virgin. We see the Jesus of adolescent years in the temple, amazing and astounding the doctors of religion that He could have such wisdom. And as we see Jesus then beginning His public ministry, as He walked, and as He went, He was perfect, He was whole; He had complete fellowship with the Father. There was, as if to say no veil that separated Christ and the Father. And this is very important because that means the unity that Jesus speaks in John 17, becomes a focal point for our eyes to see. If He was complete and perfect, He walked in and incomplete and fallen world. You can’t understand His sufferings and the depths of His sufferings until you understand the height of His joy. And between extremities, when we look at how extreme these are, it’s only there that we can start taking and gleaning some of these concepts. Jesus lacked nothing. Now you say, “Well, that’s a glib statement,” He lacked nothing. But think of Jesus this way. Think of Jesus as what Adam was intended to be. And Adam lacked nothing. Before the fall every real necessity that a human being could need, Adam had. So, when Jesus came walking through the streets of contaminated and fallen man, He Himself not knowing sin walked as a complete man. Therefore, in His completeness, you’ll find in many of those references where it speaks of His unity with the Father, joy, peace, love and they are; they are undetached; perfect fellowship, perfect Communion. And yet, Jesus was acquainted with; we read that passage in Isaiah, “acquainted with our grief; a man of sorrows, acquainted.” He bore our; I want to put the focus on, we’ve always talked about the grief and suffering, but it was ours that He bore, not His. It was ours. He bore; put it for you, He bore your sickness, He bore your disease, He bore and carried away your sin. Not, when we say “ours” it sounds very generic and we focus on the words “grief, sorrow,” but they were ours, not somebody else’s. So we begin to look at this perfect Communion that Jesus had walking among imperfect fallen man, He comes with the keys for reconciliation. He comes with the keys to restore; He comes to the keys and the possibility. And all the while; remember, perfect Communion with the Father, and yet having to deal with fallen humanity. Maybe this won’t even strike a chord with you, but how could perfect man, who is man and God, walk in the streets amongst what is absolutely broken and fallen, and not see everywhere God misunderstood, God misrepresented? The disease of the soul; sin everywhere permeated around Him. I mean, think about that. A perfect being walking, and everywhere that your eye can look is contaminated. So as He went, it’s no mystery then that is as He went, we also glean some other things. That the sufferings that He encountered, He took Himself as He went. Some suffered because of disease, some suffered because of sin, some suffered because they lacked, and some suffered because they had too much like the rich young ruler. We always focus on the rich young ruler, but imagine the suffering that was incurred to Christ, what grief it caused Him when the man would not part with his possessions. We always think of the griefs that are obvious, but what about the not so obvious things? So, I’m going to travel through the Scriptures and give you at least an example of what these sufferings will culminate in. We’re going to focus on one Greek word, and before I get to that word I want to try and make an illustration, which will fall terribly short. So, forgive me. I’m trying to approach this reverently, but it’s very difficult patchwork this. A husband and wife; let’s say the wife has a terminal disease. The husband is always moved and deeply afflicted, but he does not experience the same pain as the wife who is terminally ill. But being a loving spouse, you feel some sort of pain. Or when someone betrays us with lies and they’re caught in their lie, we are the ones who are grieved because the truth would serve better than a lie. Or we encounter someone as an addiction, a drug addiction, and we watch them plummet themselves lower and lower, but we must incur the suffering, watching helplessly to try and get them delivered and seemingly can’t. Now that’s like a microcosm. Magnify that infinitely to understand what type of pain and suffering Jesus took to Himself as He went. Not just the diseases and the sin, but other things, which we’ll touch on. Now it’s quite remarkable that within the New Testament there is one word, and I alluded to it a few weeks ago, that is uniquely used of Christ. This word is reserved for Him. It’s either used by Him, of Him, or someone is speaking toward Him in this regard, and it’s a word very simple in the English language that looks like this. Compassion. In every occurrence where this word is being translated, and Lord help me to write it for you in the Greek, because it’s one of those, it’s one of those words that you pray you never have to pronounce. Here we go. I’ll write it for you, and then you’ll know why. I’ll spare you. It looks like this. Now only Jesus could pronounce anyways, I’m sure. So, splag-, splagchi-, -ghnizoma. Achooee. All right, so for the ones who want to see what it looks like in English phonetic letters, you may want to scribble this in your Bibles somewhere. It looks like this. And it looks good on radio, I’m sure too, as I’m, I’m writing for the people on radio and I know you can see on radio. Never mind. S p l a g c h i z o m a i. Radio people rejoiced. All right. Those poor people always get left out, “What’s she writing?” I do that deliberately, because I want you to get a computer or something. So that one word, every time it appears it is used of Jesus, for Jesus, and by Jesus. “Compassion” is our English translation. I want to tell you a little bit about this word, because I’m going to get into the message now, and I want you to really get this. I mean, when I read this, I had to stop for a minute and kind of, it’s like chewing on something good. You don’t want to eat it too quickly. I had to really savor this. The Greek word has at its root the same word we would translate our English word for “spleen.” But, if we were just to examine the Greek concept, it is something that is beyond, beyond strictly physical frame. It is a word that describes some emotion that causes deep intense pain, almost even to bring on nausea or fainting, to be so moved with something internally. So remember each time we encounter Jesus being moved with compassion, there’s something going on inside His being. From the English frame, let’s split this word. So, com, which is our Latin word “together” and “passion” in the Latin frame would be pati, from where we get words like “sympathy,” right. Sympathy, pati; so we could say Jesus had sympathy, or Jesus had empathy, but it would not even scratch the surface of this word. By the 12th century, 12th century, this word “passion” in the English language was used exclusively for one thing: Jesus Christ on the cross, and His finished work, His passion at the cross. See, as words begin to morph into a more modern usage, their original sense goes further and further away. So the translators actually knew what they were doing when they did this. It’s not haphazard that included in this word we’re using a translation that’s from the 1611 version. But I’m sure that this word being used by the 12th century carried with it the connotations pointing to Christ, and nothing more. Now we have a modern word “passion” that carries with it lustful ideas and sinful thoughts; or someone is passionate about music. And it completely leaves the idea of its original intent. So, this will give you little picture word that when we encounter Jesus being moved with compassion, from the English frame, carry with me as we go through these Scriptures that He was actually together to the cross. From English translators’ point of view, He was moved with compassion in His innermost being, but He was also carrying these things to the cross. Which lets me say one last word about this and then we’re going to get into the meat and potatoes of the message. This word here; and if you’re not a grammarian, folks don’t worry about it. We’ll explain it the best I can. This is occurring the majority the time, not all the time, but the majority of the time it is occurring in what is called in the Greek, “middle deponent.” And middle deponent is just like middle voice. So active; active means I am, I am writing and I am standing here writing. That’s active. I’m doing it. And passive means somebody wrote something on the board, but it wasn’t me, and I just stood here, and looked at the writing. And in the middle voice, it is, I am writing this for myself. So in the middle voice in the Greek, the actor is performing something that they are doing to bring back to themselves; an act that they’re performing for themselves to bring back something to themselves. So when Jesus was moved with compassion, it is occurring in the middle; and why it is a deponent is because no active voice for this verb occurs. Which means it really; it’s like narrowing it down to a fine laser beam and saying, “Only could Jesus do this.” So, to simplify it, if you’re not a grammarian, the active voice is kicked out because not something that we can do. This is something used of Jesus. All right. Now, we got all the hard stuff out of the way, right; so you think. So now let’s put this in to; all right; let’s put this into practice, because I want us to be able to line up all of these things and I really want you to me catch the vision of what I’m saying through the pictures that we’re going to encounter now in the Scripture. So please, if you will, turn with me to Matthew 9 and 35. And I don’t want this to be just Scripture reading. What I want you to really focus on is Jesus, the same yesterday, today and forever. That means Jesus is still being moved with compassion. Just because we cannot see Him; I wish there’d be some today who’d be so inspired in the faith, reaching up. You may leave here saying, “I don’t feel any different and I don’t look any different,” but just reaching up into the eternal and infinite principles of faith. In our little, finite bubble we can’t see too well. But reaching by faith, we can appropriate much that is given to us through these concepts. So let’s start first with the multitudes. And we’re going to narrow this down, so I’m going to give you three examples of Jesus being moved with compassion regarding the multitudes. This first one is in Matthew 9 and beginning at verse 35 and 36. “Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom,” notice He’s not giving and dispensing good advice, “and healing every sickness and disease among the people.” You know, friends, let me tell you what that says. It means that there’s no condition in this room or wherever you’re listening right now, there is no condition He does not know about. There’s not something that He’s going to say, “Wow! Well, I never heard of that one before.” Every disease, every sickness. “But when he saw the multitudes he was moved with compassion.” There is your first occurrence, “He was moved with compassion on them.” He took something to Himself. There was a stirring inside beyond just a, some sympathetic, “Oh dear, look at these poor people.” There’s something went on inside of Him. This word is suggesting that, “because they had fainted, they were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd.” So in this first instance He’s moved with compassion for the multitudes of sheep having no shepherd, no guidance, no leader. There He sees Himself. The second time within Matthew’s Gospel again, and I’m going to take you just a few pages over to Matthew 15 and verse 32. Now let me give you the background to this verse here. Let’s start, again regarding the multitudes at verse 30. “Great multitudes came unto him, having with them those that were lame, blind, dumb, maimed,” or crippled, “and many others.” That’s a cast of thousand when it says, “many others, cast them down at Jesus feet; and he healed them: insomuch that the multitude wondered when they saw that dumb to speak, and the maimed,” the crippled, “whole, and the lame to walk, and the blind to see; they glorified the God of Israel. Then Jesus called his disciples unto him, and said, I have compassion on the multitude,” there it is again. Something moved inside of Him; and keep in mind the English translators had already envisioned the word speaking of His passion at the cross; everywhere He went, He spoke of death; everywhere. So, He says, “I have compassion on the multitude, because they continue with the now three days, and have nothing to eat: and I will not some away fasting, lest they faint in the way.” So, this second example of Jesus being moved with compassion: hungry souls. The first go round: lonely souls, forgotten souls, abandoned souls. Here we have hungry souls. And whether this is a spiritual hunger or a real hunger; I prefer to read just the way it is. The third one dealing with multitudes is just a few pages back, in Matthew 14, and here we have; and it will all make sense, believe me. This is like a paper chase, but it will take you somewhere. So, in Matthew 14 and 14, “Jesus went forth, saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion toward them, and he healed their sick,” their infirm. And that word is a different type of sick. It covers the broad spectrum of sickness. So in the multitudes, we read and we see clearly that in the multitudes, in the example compassion, we have; we’re going to call them just the lonely souls, those that had no shepherd. We have in the second example of the multitudes we have hungry, hungry souls. And in my third example we have sickness of every kind, sick, sickness of every kind. So now we go from the multitude and Him being moved with compassion. Let’s narrow it down just a little bit to two blind lepers who are out there begging on the street. That’s Matthew 20. Matthew 20, and let’s see what happens here; Matthew 20 and verse 29. So we’ve gone from the multitudes, three times. Now we’re starting to get down to the individual needs. And I’m going to have you take notice of something. At verse 29, “As they departed from Jericho, a great multitude followed him.” Multitudes are still there, but watch what the multitudes say now. “Behold, two blind men sitting by the way side, when they heard that Jesus passed by, they cried out, saying, Have mercy on us,” that’s not compassion; it’s a different word, eleason, “Have mercy on us, O Lord, thou son of David. And the multitude, the multitude rebuked them.” I don’t suppose maybe this was the same multitude that may have received something from Him. They rebuked him. They rebuked the men, blind begging men; they “rebuked them, because they should hold their peace: but they cried more, saying, Have mercy on us, O Lord, thou son of David,” again, eleason, “mercy.” “And Jesus stood still, and called and them, and said, What will ye that I shall do unto you?” And I want you to take note of this when we get to the table. Each person knows what you would like for the Lord to touch. If it’s a sickness and you need healing, only you know what that is. I can’t do it for you. Just like these where they had specificity, Jesus says, “What would you like me to do to you?” What is it? And they spoke it forth. “They said unto him, Lord, that our eyes may be opened.” And this is what’s remarkable to me. These are too blind beggars that get rebuked by the multitudes and they say, “Have mercy on us,” they asked the Lord that their eyes might be opened. And I want you to say, see this: that they have more sight to see God with their blind eyes than many of people who have sight to see, which is a lot of our problem. The Lord is already here. The Lord is already with us. The Lord is already healing us. The Lord is already forgiven us. “Jesus had compassion on them, touched their eyes and immediately their eyes received sight, and they followed him.” Now, we’re going to narrow it down a little bit more, just kind of bring it down the pipeline here. Turn with me now to Mark; each one of these, He’s moved with compassion. Mark 1:41 and I’m going to start at 1:40. Why is important to lay all this foundation? Because somewhere in these examples you will find your need today; somewhere in all of these examples of Jesus being moved with compassion, you will find yourself. You say, “But Pastor, I don’t have a sickness today. That’s not my need,” right. Remember the first group in the multitude: lonely souls. The second ones hungered, then there were the sick. Now we have the blind beggars healed. And I believe, by the way, as they followed Jesus; you may say, “This is a very bold statement to make,” but as these blind beggars received their sight and followed Jesus, I believe they begged no more, because following Jesus gave them all the provisions they needed. Listen, we live in a land of plenty. People live over and above and take and call “necessity” more than is necessary. So think of this that these simple that we find in Christ can supply all of our needs. So here, “A leper came to him,” in verse 40; this is Mark 1 and verse 40, “beseeching him, kneeling down to him, and saying unto him,” again expressing the need. “Jesus, can You know our thoughts?” Absolutely, but these, they spoke out. They spoke out their need, “If thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.” I want you to think of the ramifications of this leper being ostracized from society, alienated from his friends and family, disconnected from the worship in the temple. And please, you say to me, “Well, that’s leprosy.” No. That is what happens by and large to most believers today. They are ostracized and put out the church because they don’t fit the cookie-cutter of what church world like them to be. I read this and I find myself here. Jesus made me clean. Jesus made me whole. I don’t need the acceptance of the brethren, or somebody else. He’s brought me into the fold, He’s make me one of His, just like this one. Find yourself in these examples. Verse 41, “And Jesus was moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and said unto him, I will; be thou clean. And as soon as he had spoken, immediately the leprosy departed from him, he was cleansed.” Well, we can, I can keep going. There’s more examples in Luke’s Gospel. Let me just recount them to you, because there’s really one more I want to highlight, which is in Luke’s Gospel telling of the widow coming from Nain, and it’s a funeral and her son is the one that’s in the casket. He’s dead, she’s a widow, which means not only did she suffer the loss of her spouse, but now it says clearly, this is the loss of her only son. And as the funeral procession makes its way, Jesus, it says He was moved with compassion. He took it to Himself. If you can’t get on the page with me, please, because it is so revolutionary to think that even the dead young man, He took that to Himself because He spoke and immediately straightway the young man sat up and began to speak. He called from the dead to life. He took that to Himself. It’s like He had in charge account before He actually went to the cross where He was busy taking it all as He went. Moved with compassion that those things He would go and take them into His being, and He carried them. Isaiah, who could even imagine? I don’t even think Isaiah could. The concept, the visual of taking and carrying; taking physically, taking it and carrying it to Himself, and carried it to the cross. And we see this picture of Jesus being moved with compassion. I want you to catch the idea behind these words I’ve used. We’ve given you a direct concept of Jesus taking all of the suffering to Himself and of all the glories that followed in the immediate realm, that is everywhere that there was suffering, where Jesus was touched to touch their infirmities, glories followed. Now there are glories are yet to be revealed in our present life and the glories of a future time in the Book of Revelation. I’m speaking only today of the sufferings and glories while Jesus in his lifetime lived and walked among us and facing the cross. Now I giving in to direct, let’s go to the indirect, because we tend to not think what other sufferings did Jesus take along the way. From going back to His hometown in Nazareth, where as a young man He was loved and received. But now He goes back as a teacher, telling them, “Repent, the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” And in the process of telling them to repent, they sought to kill Him and push Him off the hill, rejecting him. He was despised and rejected. You don’t think He had to take that suffering too? We only think of the things we know about, our sins and our sickness; but what about the rejection? What about spiritual blindness, what I call spiritual farsightedness of the religious people? He says, “You search the Scriptures, thinking that there is life in them, but I stand in front of you telling you that I’m the life.” Spiritual farsightedness that standing right in front of them, and yet they couldn’t see. They were spiritually blind. You don’t think He took that suffering to the cross? Or, let’s just go to a deeper level. At the height of His glory, the disciples, He points to them and He says, “These are my mother and my brothers, these that do the will of the Father.” That’s the height of His glory. To the depth of the depravity of being betrayed by a kiss, to the depth of the depravity that He had foretold that Peter would deny Him. Spiritual indifference; He took that to the cross too. Pilate, who couldn’t be bothered, “Why do you bother me with this issue?” In Jesus final hours facing the cross, He dealt with lying, denial, spiritual hypocrisy, spiritual indifference; all of these we forget He took them also to Himself to the cross. Magnify those sufferings, not just the ones we can know because there are us, but He took it all. And when we get to this idea somehow that is this a cruel concept? Well, Hebrews 12 makes a very bold proclamation. Let me read it to you, if you want to turn there with me, I’ll only read one portion of Hebrews 12. Hebrews 12 and verse 2, “Looking unto Jesus the” architect, “the author and finisher of faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.” Think about that for a minute and think about all the things that Jesus took to the cross. It’s very easy to get caught up in the fact and say, “Well, Jesus used to…” There’s a lot of people that say, “These things that we read about are no more.” Well, if that’s true, and according to those people that that is true, then, then we have a vain and empty faith believing for the forgiveness of our sins. And yet when we comb the Scriptures, we have abundant reference, abundantly by the New Testament writers telling us of the efficacy and the finished work at the cross. Now I’m going to fast forward and say all of these sufferings are, it’s like speeding them up to one moment where out of Jesus’ lips, He says, “It is finished.” And I don’t think, I don’t think there is a human alive, who could adequately depict the horrible moments before His death, before that last breath. And in that moment, I believe, because no one can imagine what the darkness of the world was taken to Him at that moment. I don’t think anyone, not one of us here can even fathom that on our darkest and worst day, at our most sinful and base; because we have two conditions that need to be met, our Adam nature and the sins we sin daily; at our basest, at our worst, at our ugliest; magnify that by the world and whatever He incurred in Himself is probably not even, the number, the depth of it is not even utterable; you couldn’t give utterance to it. So how, how sad that when we approach this Table we’re not looking to His final words from the cross; oh, we know He is risen, and I believe in the Resurrection and the resurrected life, but right now we’re focusing on one thing: the finished work. That all the sufferings had glories attached to it. He didn’t suffer for naught. And I would say also parenthetically that as we go day by day, the things that we place before Him, He is always and continuously removing. Most of the time; and I’ll you this because it took me a little few years to get there; most of the time, we’re really not committing our way and our sins and our problems to the cross. We take it in our mind; we believe and then “help mine unbelief.” The mouth, the mouth is engaged and the heart and the mind are somewhere else. Let this faith act become exactly what was intended to do, to focus our minds on the compassion of Christ that as He walked, breathed, and lived among fallen creation, He was perfect and yet became sin for us, who knew no sin. And every single disease known to man; cancer, and diabetes, and disorders of every nature, anything that we could possibly think of, any malady; if Jesus came to reconcile the world to Himself, that is to take back what Adam plunged into darkness, then the restoration process includes forgiveness of sins and our total well-being and health. Somebody said to me, “What happens if you keep knocking at the door of grace and for some reason the Lord doesn’t answer and you’re not healed?” What did I just say to you about your sins? Let me ask you this question and give you a little something to ponder. I sat; it’s a funny statement; I sat at the partner’s desk in Dr. Scott’s house, I sat cross, cross-legged on the top of the table, on top of the desk. He was sitting in his chair and he was really reflecting about how he’d preached healing in the atonement for all these years and it was, it was me. I said to him, “Well, wait a minute. You tell me my sins are forgiven and I cannot see my sins forgiven.” I can’t see them, no more than you can see your healing. We appropriate it by faith and as I walk, when I take the cup and I walk away, I walk away saying, “I am forgiven.” Likewise when we take the bread, “I am healed.” There’s no hope in saying, “Well, I sure hope I’m forgiven.” Tell me what good; what good does that bring us as we proclaim Christ? But I want you to think about this. This should jar your thinking to the approach and the doorway to this Table. That if you and I say, “Well, I sure hope my sins are forgiven,” you haven’t even, you have frustrated the grace of God, rejected Him afresh and not even understood what He came to do, which was to restore us to Communion and fellowship with God. So I’d say to you today, as we begin our approach and we’re, we’ve got the landing gear out and we’re ready to make the approach, think of the Table in the same light. Both must carry the same weight. Don’t say, “Well, I know the Lord has forgiven my sins, but I don’t know if He’s going to heal me. These things occur by faith, and is your faith reaching up to say, “The Lord washed and cleansed me, Lord healed me, the Lord has preserved me.” You know, we sing songs, but do we believe them? We read scriptures, but do we believe them? Jesus said, “Anyone who eats of this bread shall have life everlasting,” but yet, why do people mourn so deeply when they speak of death or a loved one dying? So, I’m asking you, just jar your thoughts for a minute. If all of these things were taken to Him; we know what the Scripture says when we read the passage out of Isaiah and looking at Peter’s words, and he puts it in the past and says, “By his stripes ye were healed,” putting it past tense, because of that work at the cross. Then, walk in it today. And as you leave here, you may say, “I still don’t, maybe I still don’t feel like I’ve been healed”; faithe to walk in it, just like I am faithing to know that I am saved. And by the way, let me just say a little personal, parenthetical sidebar. I don’t doubt my salvation for a minute. My Savior is as real to me today by this book, by the power of His Holy Spirit, as real to me today as you sitting in front of me. Now I don’t have the need for healing today, and yet I have a need for healing. Hear this, because too often we say it’s, it’s a physical infirmity. The bread is also there for spiritual infirmary as well. So, the cup covers our sins, but we need healing as a church. So there are specific things only you can appropriate for yourselves. I’m going to have the musicians come and I’m going to have the ushers come, and I’d like you to just pay close attention to what I’m going to say to you. Please wait for everyone to be served. We’re going to pass out both elements. Every single one of us, every one of us has a need to be healed; and at some point it may be magnified and more than others. This is one many doorways. I’ve said to you as a congregation, I’ll explore, I’ll go through and find the doorways. There are those who are sick and then I’ve said many times I believe in calling elders and anointing with oil and laying hands on people. This is another doorway. We’re looking to this bread as a doorway to look at all the ways Jesus was moved with compassion to take our sicknesses to the cross. And He’s still healing. Now, I want us to take the bread together with that faith level that says, “Lord, whatever happens in my life, You of the Lord of my life and I’m your child, and I come to this Table knowing that every single need that I have is met. Today, I have the need of healing,” and as I said in may be deep sickness, it may be recovering from a surgery, it may be a spiritual; and I’m not speaking of sins, but we have people who fight constantly in the spiritual realm against oppressive forces and need healing there, too. I inquired of one of our younger people in the church who is kind gone her own way, another one. And believe me; it grieves me because I’ll ask all the time, “Where is this person?” For the parents who watch the child go away, that type of healing is needed as well. There’s no sin, and you as a parent having done all that you could, but you too need healing today. That bread represents not just the big ticket items, but the smaller ones, too, because He paid it all at Calvary. So I want you to take this bread with me, and we know with His stripes you were, putting it in the past tense, but I’m going to lift a passage out of Jeremiah. Jeremiah 17:14, Jeremiah says, “Heal me, O LORD, and I shall be healed.” So I want you to just say that with me right now. “Heal me, O LORD, and I shall be healed.” Take the bread in Jesus’ name. We’ve just touched, on the need. And I want to remind you that as Jesus went, except for the boy that was raised from the dead, all the places He was moved compassion were needs that needed to be met. Now there’s one area, as I said, that, at some point, we lift this cup and we look to the cup, beyond it to that shed blood at Calvary and a wholeness that comes not just from the bread healing our body, but a wholeness. Some blueprint in our nature, not just a one-time sin or the issues that you and I deal with, but our condition, our nature to have restored fellowship. The prophet Isaiah says your sins have separated you from God. There cannot be a more, truer statement, but not because of the acts we do. It’s the condition we’re born in. This cup provides the doorway just to look through and know the shed blood at Calvary, that fount that will forever flow until He comes again, has washed every single child of God clean. Don’t walk around with guilt. This is not a table of guilt. Don’t walk around saying, “But I know what I’ve done.” Place it at the cross. He bore it and paid it all there. Lift the cup with me today. And I’m going to claim out of Ephesians, just a little page just to say we have redemption. Through His blood we have redemption, complete payment in full for our sins: complete. Let no one come back and say, “Well, where do you stand?” I stand beneath that cross, the shadow of the cross looking to that precious blood, knowing He paid the price for me. If no one else came, He bought and cleansed me, but I know there’s a roomful people here who have been bought and cleansed by the precious blood. So, will you take the cup with me? And, Lord, we thank You for Your shed blood that makes us whole, that cleanses us and makes us worthy. We thank You for it, in Jesus’ name. You have been watching me, Pastor Melissa Scott, live from Glendale, California at Faith Center. If you would like to attend the service with us, Sunday morning at 11am, simply call 1-800-338-3030 to receive your pass. If you’d like more teaching and you would like to go straight to our website, the address is www.PastorMelissaScott.com

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